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  • IETF 114 post-meeting survey

    The results from our IETF 114 post-meeting survey are now available on a web-based interactive dashboard. This commentary highlights where changes we have made based on feedback have been a success, and areas we still need to work on.

    • Jay DaleyIETF Executive Director
    18 Aug 2022
  • Presenting at my first IETF meeting

    Walking up to the check-in desk at IETF 114, my very first IETF meeting, was a very strange experience for me. However, over the course of the three days that I was there, I ended up having a great newcomers experience.

    • Lauren Delwiche
    15 Aug 2022
  • Suggested IETF 114 Sessions for Getting Familiar with New Topics

    This list of sessions at the IETF 114 meeting are likely to include discussions and new proposals that are accessible to a broad range of Internet technologists whether they are new to the IETF or long-time participants.

      19 Jul 2022
    • The value of in-person collaboration

      As the world slowly recovers from COVID-19, in-person meetings at IETF and other organizations are coming back.

      • Grant GrossIETF Blog Reporter
      15 Jul 2022
    • A New Model for the RFC Editor Function

      The new RFC Editor Model is intended to provide greater transparency, improved responsiveness to the needs of the community, and increased clarity regarding the roles and responsibilities of the groups and individuals involved.

      • Peter Saint-Andre
      30 Jun 2022

    Filter by topic and date

    Filter by topic and date

    Of Birds and RATS

    • Alissa CooperIETF Chair

    3 Oct 2018

    Two Birds of a Feather sessions have been approved for the next IETF meeting, one of which focuses on Remote ATtestation ProcedureS (RATS).

    Siamese Fireback

    Before each IETF meeting, the Internet Engineering Steering Group (IESG) collects proposals for Birds of a Feather (BOF) sessions. These sessions are designed to help determine the path for new work in the IETF or to generate discussion about a topic within the IETF community. For IETF 103, we approved two out of the four BOF proposals received. We are encouraging further development of the proponents’ ideas and discussion in side meetings about the other two.

    The two other proposals received were “Handling IPsec configurations in large scale SD-WAN deployment with constrained resources” (SDWAN-SEC) and “Removing offensive terminology in RFCs” (ROT-RFC), both of which propose interesting ideas that appear better suited for a side meeting or informal conversation than for formal BOFs. The SDWAN-SEC proposal was focused on a few different approaches to handling IPsec configuration in large-scale SDN environments. ROT-RFC proposed a discussion about reducing the use of potentially offensive terminology, such as “master/slave,” in RFCs. Hopefully IETF 103 will provide a useful venue for proponents in both areas to further develop their ideas with the community.

    The Remote ATtestation Procedures (RATS) BOF was approved in the Security area. Here “attestation” means the process of establishing the properties of the hardware with which a remote endpoint is communicating, such as the processor or device type. Attestation allows the remote endpoint to trust assertions made by the device in question about security-related functionality or behavior. A number of ad hoc solutions exist in this space, but alignment is lacking around terminology, what can be considered as attestation evidence, interfaces for establishing trust, and data models. The goal of this BOF is to charter a working group that can standardize the components needed for interoperable remote attestation. Discussion is underway on the mailing list.

    The WGs Using GitHub (WUGH) BOF was approved in the General area. This non-working-group forming BOF was first held at IETF 98 to discuss IETF-wide documentation about how to use GitHub effectively in WG processes. At that time, it seemed premature to try to achieve consensus around common practices for using GitHub within IETF WGs. Since then, more WGs and document authors have started using GitHub to facilitate IETF work in different ways. This BOF will aim to foster community discussion about establishing administrative processes and usage conventions to allow WGs and authors to get started using GitHub for IETF work in a more uniform way. (See a starting point at draft-cooper-wugh-github-wg-configuration.) It will also discuss best practices for using GitHub in WGs (see, e.g., draft-thomson-github-bcp-00). Join the ietf-and-github mailing list to participate in the discussion.


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